Posted in editorial rant, growth, training, Uncategorized, workplace

Educating for career; career for philanthropy

philanthropy definitionI was reminded lately that education’s goal is not career, but to improve the world.

What is a career?

Is it aggressive planning and moving forwards in the workplace? Sideways and backwards moves can result in long term career progression. Planning can be a good idea, but many will tell you of the felicity of grabbing an unforetold opportunity – flexibility is instrumental. And I’m not convinced that most people’s objectives are quite that simple.

There is quote from Aristotle above my desk –

Where talents and the needs of the world cross, therein lies your vocation. — Aristotle

This ideal can move education and career into the realm of philanthropy.

The alignment between mission and role – and personal morals and ideals – now becomes vital.

Does your current work improve the world?

Would gaining more knowledge and skills (ie. education for career) put you in a place to achieve a higher gain for the world?

For some, it might be that pure wealth acquisition is what drives their career – temper this with social investment, and the big-business corporate manager is suddenly someone who can impact the lives of others in a very real way.

Ridiculous yachts and private planes and big limousines won’t make people enjoy life more, and it sends out terrible messages to the people who work for them. It would be so much better if that money was spent in Africa – and it’s about getting a balance. — Richard Branson

For the rest of us, being able to give of our money, time, or talents for not-for-profits can be in a myriad of ways.

I’ve chosen to spend some time working on creating courses to help make fundraisers more effective. I also am a regular donor to one charity, and support others by doing fun runs. Lastly, I belong to a few membership organisations that promote the industries I work in.

I’m in no ways a bastion of goodness. And I know that one day its likely I’ll go back to working For-Profit, that’s how things go. But through my work, my career, I’m looking to make the world a better place.

Including everyone in the economic, wealth-creating life of the nation is today the best way for Labor (Australian Labor Party) to meet its twin goals of raising national prosperity and creating a fair and decent society. — Julia Gillard

Research is showing that as the Boomer generation retire from their ‘work’, they are looking to make a difference in the NFP space.

With the wisdom of a full life, new time on their hands and the wealth to finance their lifestyle, Baby Boomers will have an unprecedented chance to engage in volunteerism and other acts of philanthropy. — Sean Stannard-Stockton

There are also statistics showing that Gen-Y/Millennials are starting higher education and work – planning to make a difference through their career.

Millennials want to be leaders of social change now, because they already have seen evidence that their talents, ideas, and contributions can make a lasting impact in society.  Harnessing the energy, tech savvy ability, and complex diversity of Generation Y is important for nonprofit organizations to understand. — Ian Adair

Is career counter to the needs of the world?

Without even touching on what lifelong learning can do for human psychology – I believe that career can work alongside philanthropy.

Author:

-~Authenticity, Creativity, Community~- - eLearning Consultant & Trainer & Superhero - User Interface & Course specialist for Moodle & Totara LMS - I also enjoy researching into the Humanities - esp Cultural Studies, the Arts&Crafts Movement, and Medieval Guilds - warning: my hair colour changes a lot -

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